Cultural ecology; readings on the Canadian Indians and Eskimos

  • 331 Pages
  • 2.70 MB
  • 5653 Downloads
  • English
by
McClelland and Stewart , Toronto
Human geography -- C

Places

Ca

Statementedited and with an introd. by Bruce Cox.
SeriesThe Carleton library,, no. 65
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE78.C2 C64
The Physical Object
Pagination331 p.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5098322M
LC Control Number74170205

Cultural Ecology: Readings on the Canadian Indians and Eskimos Edited and with an Introduction by Bruce Cox. Series: Carleton the study of what has come to be known as cultural ecology owes an equally heavy debt to early studies of Canadian indigenous peoples and their wildlife conservation practices.

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Description Cultural ecology; readings on the Canadian Indians and Eskimos FB2

readings on the Canadian Indians and Eskimos. Bruce Alden Cox, Carleton University. Institute of Canadian Studies. Macmillan, Cultural Ecology: Readings on the Canadian Indians and Eskimos. Get this from a library. Cultural ecology; readings on the Canadian Indians and Eskimos.

[Bruce Alden Cox] -- Collection of essays on Canada's native peoples and their relationship to the various environmental settings: the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence area. Get this from a library. Cultural ecology: readings on the Canadian Indians and Eskimos.

[Bruce Alden Cox; Carleton University. Institute of Canadian Studies.;]. Cultural ecology: readings on the Canadian Indians and Eskimos. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, [] pages ; 18 cm.

(DLC) Material Type: Document, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors: Bruce Alden Cox. Get this from a library. Cultural ecology: readings on the Canadian Indians and Eskimos. [Bruce Alden Cox;].

His scholarly publications include works on conflict resolution, ethnohistory, and intellectual history. He was the editor of A Different Drummer: Readings in Anthropology with a Canadian Perspective and Cultural Ecology: Readings on the Canadian Indians and Eskimos. Canadian governments and churches pursued a policy of “cultural genocide” against the country’s aboriginal people throughout the 20th century, according to an investigation into a long.

In: Cultural Ecology: Readings on the Canadian Indians and Eskimos. edn. Edited by Cox B. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart Limited; Edited by Cox B. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart Limited; Rather, we examine how technology can serve community and other needs.

No single option emerges as a clear best choice for communicating indigenous knowledge. Nevertheless, various media types offer avenues through which northern people can meet their educational, cultural, and political needs, and build cross-cultural understanding. Native People, Native Lands: Canadian Indians, Inuit and Metis Edited by Bruce Alden Cox Yet, in spite of their early prominence, the number of books and articles specifically concerned with the Métis people is very small.

References cited in the edition ofCultural Ecology, for example, had a relatively early median average. Grey owl's return: Cultural ecology and Canadian indigenous peoples *. For those unfamiliar with “indigenous” Canadian romanticism, Grey Owl is the pseudonymn of one Archie Belaney, an English eccentric who immigrated to Canada in the first decade of this century and took up life as a trapper in frontier areas still largely inhabited by Algonkian Indians.

Women's status in preindustrial communities has been the focus of a number of studies in the past two decades. However, very few of these studies deal exclusively with hunter/gatherers, and none of the hunter/gatherer studies combine empirical tests with explanations.

Because of a number of differences with settled agricultural villagers, hunter/gatherers can be viewed as the focus of. The ethno-ecology of the Waswanipi Cree: Or how hunters can manage their resources.

In Cox, B. (ed.), Cultural Ecology: Readings on the Canadian Indians and Eskimos, McClelland and Stewart, Toronto, Canada, pp. – ‘The Significance of Hunting Territories Today.’ In Cox, B.

(ed.) Cultural Ecology: Readings on the Canadian Indians and Eskimos.

Details Cultural ecology; readings on the Canadian Indians and Eskimos PDF

Toronto, McLellan and Stewart, pp. ‘Existent-ils des Territoires de Chasse?’ Recherches Amerin­diennes au Quebec 1 ():‘Occupation and Life Style in Two Minority Communities.’.

Canada’s indigenous culture includes that of the First Nations, Métis and Inuit histories and traditions are unique and helped shape Canada’s identity. Keep reading to find out how you can learn more about Canada’s Aboriginal culture within many of the country’s cities and provinces.

Once known as Eskimos, the Inuit inhabit the Arctic region, one of the most forbidding territories on earth.

Occupying lands that stre miles from parts of Siberia, along the Alaskan coast, across Canada, and on to Greenland, the Inuit are one of the most widely dispersed people in the world, but number only ab in population.

Feit, H.A. The ethno-ecology of the Waswanipi Cree; or how hunters can manage their resources. In: B. Cox (ed), Cultural ecology: readings on Canadian Indians and Eskimos (pp. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: McClelland and Stewart Limited. Google Scholar. Storytelling is an integral part of Indigenous culture, rooted in tradition, communication and celebration.

These must-read children's books by Indigenous authors exquisitely explore history. In: Cultural Ecology: Readings on the Canadian Indians and Eskimos. edn. Edited by Cox B. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart; Osgood C: The Han Indians: A Compilation of Ethnographic and Historical Data on the Alaska-Yukon Boundary Area, vol.

Yale University Publications in Anthropology Number New Haven: Department of. Feit, H. The ethno-ecology of the Waswanipi Cree: Or how hunters can manage their resources.

In Cox, B. (ed.),Cultural Ecology: Readings on the Canadian Indians and Eskimos. McClelland and Stewart, Toronto, pp. – Google Scholar.

The ethno-ecology of the Waswanipi Cree: or, how hunters can manage their resources. In Cultural Ecology: Readings on the Canadian Indians and Eskimos. Bruce A. Cox (ed.): Figgins, J.D.

The antiquity of man in America. Natural History Fitzhugh, William W. Bruce Cox, al Ecology: Readings on the Canadian Indians and Eskimos. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, pp.

Maps and appendix. $ (paper). Read more. Canadian Eskimo Arts Council. Sculpture/Inuit. Doubleday, Nancy C. “Sustaining Arctic Visions, Values and Ecosystems: Writing Inuit Identity, Reading Inuit Art in Cape Dorset, Nunavut.” In Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit and Inuit Cultural Ecology.” Arctic Anthropol no.

2 (): Weizman, Eyal. Forensic Architecture. and the Indian Chief. Heart and the Three Tests. Boy of the Red Twilight Sky. Raven Brought Fire to the Indians. The Girl who Always Cried. Ermine and the Hunter. How Rabbit Deceived Fox.

Download Cultural ecology; readings on the Canadian Indians and Eskimos FB2

The Boy and the Dragon. Owl with the Great Head and Eyes. The Tobacco Fairy from the Blue Hills. Rainbow and. Indigenous Canadians (also known as Aboriginal Canadians, Native Canadians or First Peoples) are the Indigenous peoples within the boundaries of Canada.

They comprise the First Nations, Inuit and Métis. Although "Indian" is a term still commonly used in legal documents, the descriptors "Indian" and "Eskimo" have somewhat fallen into disuse in Canada, and some consider them to be pejorative. The two main peoples known as Eskimo are the Inuit (including the Alaskan Iñupiat, the Greenlandic Inuit, and the diverse Inuit of Canada) and the Yupik of eastern Siberia and Alaska.

A third northern group, the Aleut, is closely related to share a relatively recent common ancestor and a language group, Eskimo-Aleut. The non-Inuit sub-branch of the Eskimo branch of the Eskimo-Aleut. Tooker E: Subsistence of the Huron Indians. In: Cultural Ecology: Readings on the Canadian Indians and Eskimos.

edn. Edited by Cox B. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart; Wein EE, Sabry JH, Evers FT: Food Consumption Patterns and Use of Country Foods by Native Canadians Near Wood Buffalo National Park, Canada.

Ancient Canada. (Canadian Museum of Civilization. Mercury Ser.) Chicago: University of Chicago Press, (popular re-edition of Canadian Archaeolagv) McGhee, Robert.

Canadian Arctic Prehistory. (Canadian Prehistory Series.) Ottawa: National Museum of Man and Van Nostrand Reinhold. Canada Rediscovered. Hull, Quebec: Canadian Museum of. The First Nations flag is created with the traditional Canadian flag. There are three bold stripes, including a red o­ne o­n either side.

In the middle there is a white stripe that features a portrait of an Indian chief. The Inuit Indians are the least populated indian group in Canada. Ab Canadians self-identify as part of the Inuit. 'If Inuit have the right to cultural survival - the only alternative to total assimilation into the "southern" Canadian mainstream, then Animal Rights, Human Rights is a vitally important book.

In an era when we, as a country, are trying hard to recognize native rights and distinctiveness, Canadian should acknowledge the impact of the anti Author: George Wenzel.Get this from a library!

Animal rights, human rights: ecology, economy and ideology in the Canadian Arctic. [George W Wenzel] -- This study of the controversy surrounding the hunting of seals in the Canadian Arctic concentrates on the Inuit of Clyde River, Baffin Island, and traces the evolution of the traditional subsistence.(source: Nielsen Book Data) Summary "Environmental Anthropology: A Reader" is a collection of historically significant readings, dating from early in the twentieth century up to the present, on the cross-cultural study of relations between people and their environment.